We’re requesting qualifications for Justice, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Consultation!

 Request For Qualifications: Justice, Equity, Diversity, Inclusion Consultation for United Way of Central Oregon

 

Context

UWCO would like to bolster Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI) as it relates to organizational operations and to build an organizational culture that is cohesive and reflects our commitment to JEDI. To be effective, this work requires a holistic approach, internal leadership and participation, and external support. It must focus on what is actionable at the intersection of our JEDI commitment, our mission, and our activities. It must have a clear plan and assessment of deliverables must be measurable.  To do this, we are seeking the JEDI expertise of an external consultant.

Project goals

With a goal of infusing JEDI culture and practices into our everyday operations and our overall organizational strategy, we are seeking an experienced JEDI consultant to work with our staff and Board to develop a JEDI initiative that will guide organizational direction and priorities in response to our urgent need to address race, power, and privilege in our operational policies and practices, and our work.

Scope of Work

The successful candidate will use a variety of techniques to work with us over a period of 12-18 months to execute the scope of work (SOW).

The SOW will likely include the creation of an organization definition of JEDI, an audit to gain baseline understanding that includes key agency functions (programs, grantmaking, human resources, finance, marketing, and fundraising), a review of policies and practices, strategic planning, and work with staff and Board to develop deliverables.

Qualifications

We are seeking candidates to submit qualifications based on the following criteria:

  • Experience:
    • Working with nonprofit board and staff to develop JEDI plans that respond effectively to internal, environmental, political, and fiscal realities.
    • Working with agencies that deliver services in grantmaking, health, education, financial stability, resilience, family services, basic needs, housing, etc.
    • Delivering work products and conducting interactive sessions that incorporate a variety of perspectives on JEDI.
    • Leading discussions about race, inequality, and discrimination with multicultural sensitivity.
    • Leading discussions about bias and capacity building to recognize and reduce bias.
    • Facilitating workshops with participants of all professional levels.
    • Knowledge of policies and best practices for JEDI and Trauma Informed Care.
    • Assessing policies and practices.
    • Drafting and implementing recommendations.
    • Familiarity with Central Oregon and its culture(s)
    • Familiarity with building resilience, intersectional relationship with ACEs, and racial justice.
  • Identifies as, or represents an organization run by someone who identifies as, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning, Queer, Intersex, Pansexual, Two-Spirit, Androgynous, and Asexual (LGBTQQIP2SAA), Black, Indigenous, or Person of Color (BIPOC), and/or a population or community that experiences discrimination and exclusion (social, political, and economic) because of unequal power relationships across economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions.
  • Embraces an active approach to achieving equity for all, considering systems, structures, and processes and how these impact individuals.
  • A demonstrated focus in the nonprofit sector.

 

Budget

We have budgeted $25,000 – $30,000 for this work. Follow up and ongoing work would be conducted on a retainer basis.

Responses to this RFQ

Respondents may feel free to submit clarifying questions to Ken Wilhelm, Executive Director – United Way of Central Oregon by email or phone by September 13, 2021.  ken@unitedwaycentraloregon.org  541-389-6507.

Qualifications are due by 5:00pm September 24, 2021 by email to ken@unitedwaycentraloregon.org

Please limit your qualifications response to fewer than 5 pages and include the following:

  • Description of how you are qualified to undertake the scope of work we’ve described and examples of similar projects or clients you’ve done similar work for.
  • Description of the proposed process to undertake the SOW and deliverables you will develop.
  • Your cost proposal, any responses to budget comments above, and explanation for any deviation from it.
  • Daily or hourly rate for ongoing advice and support.
  • Description of how you will avoid any conflict of interest in undertaking the scope of work.
  • Description of your team.

In addition, please submit resumes/CVs for anyone on your team that will be directly involved in carrying out the SOW, each no longer than 2 pages. (resumes/CVs do not count toward 5-page limit).

Note: all proposals and documents submitted to UWCO will be kept confidential. UWCO is under no legal obligation to accept any proposal. We reserve the right to amend the requirements at any time.

We just awarded $245,000 to 31 local & regional nonprofits!

Grants Will Help Community Members Thrive

 

Thirty-one Central Oregon nonprofits have been collectively awarded $245,000 as part of our annual grantmaking process. As an intermediary funder, we at United Way of Central Oregon (UWCO) support local, direct-service nonprofits that focus on a wide range of human health and welfare issues – from basic needs to empowerment – through grantmaking that provides direct financial aid to these programs and services.

 

Last year, our grantmaking was focused on community needs formed by the COVID-19 pandemic. This year, we’ve returned to customary annual grantmaking cycle and focused on supporting local and regional agencies as they help our community members adapt and recover from the pandemic. This funding is helping these nonprofits as they stabilize the delivery of services that build resilience in individuals, families, and our Central Orgon community – achieving positive outcomes in the face of adversity.

 

This year’s grant recipients include: Assistance League of Bend ($3,000), Boys & Girls Clubs of Bend ($12,000), CASA of Central Oregon ($8,000), Children’s Forest of Central Oregon ($5,000), Council on Aging of Central Oregon ($5,000), DAWNS House ($8,000), Diversability, Inc ($8,000), Families Forward ($8,000), Family Access Network ($16,000), Friends of the Children – Central Oregon ($12,000), Habitat for Humanity of La Pine Sunriver Critical Home Repair ($5,000), Healing Justice Collective of Central Oregon ($5,000), Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center ($5,000), Heart of Oregon Corps ($12,000), KIDS Center ($6,000), La Pine Community Kitchen ($5,000), The Latino Community Association ($12,000), MountainStar Family Relief Nursery ($16,000), NeighborImpact Food Bank ($12,000), NeighborImpact Housing & Homeless Services ($8,000), Redmond Senior Center ($5,000), Rimrock Trails Treatment Services ($12,000), Saving Grace of Central Oregon ($7,000), Shepherd’s House Ministries ($5,000), SMART Reading ($5,000), St. Vincent De Paul – La Pine ($5,000), Society of St Vincent De Paul – Redmond ($3,000), THE SHIELD ($5,000), Thrive Central Oregon ($7,000), Treehouse Therapies Associates ($8,000), and Volunteers in Medicine Clinic of the Cascades ($12,000).

 

Nonprofit organizations that receive grants from United Way are working every day to address the most pertinent, unmet needs of individuals and families in our community. United Way’s “Community Impact Partners” are 501(c)(3) nonprofits that are assessed and rigorously reviewed on a competitive basis using standardized criteria by a Community Impact Committee (CIC), made of up volunteers representing all segments of our community, before receiving a grant. After receiving a grant, these nonprofits submit reports to United Way throughout the funding cycle.

 

Joshua Romero volunteers as Chair of UWCO’s CIC and on the Board of Directors. He said of UWCO’s grantmaking: “Central Oregon is fortunate to have so many incredible nonprofits supporting our community. I’m honored that United Way Central Oregon and our donors get to be a part of investing in these nonprofits and improving the health, education, financial stability, and resilience of everyone these organizations serve. I’m proud of our continued focus on diversity and equity in our grantmaking and am excited to see how it impacts the lives of our friends and neighbors in Central Oregon.”

 

Among the funded organizations are several first-time United Way grant recipients. Children’s Forest unites our community to inspire lifelong connections to nature for each child. Diversability, Inc. empowers community connections for individuals with diversabilities and their families. Families Forward provides small loans to help low‐income individuals and families with rental security deposits or establishing credit. Healing Justice Collective of Central Oregon exists to resource Black, Indigenous, Identifying People of Color, and historically oppressed people in their healing. Society of St Vincent De Paul – Redmond helps local community members in need. THE SHIELD provides mental health services to Central Oregon veterans and first responders. And, Treehouse Therapies Associates positively impacts children and families in our community by providing compassionate, comprehensive, and affordable therapy programs regardless of insurance or financial limitations.

 

Last year, during COVID-19, we modified our grantmaking process to award funds to address immediate emergency needs created by the pandemic and then to help the nonprofits who serve our community adapt the way they operate. We created two Funds focused on Emergency Response, Recovery, and Resilience that addressed the fallout of COVID-19 across Central Oregon, and from them awarded 44 COVID-19 Partners with $295,000 in emergency relief.

Also last year, we created a plan for distributing $500,000 that came from the City of Bend’s CARES Act funding to nonprofit organizations providing essential services to vulnerable populations. And, we were tasked with distributing $260,000+ in federal Emergency Food & Shelter funds in Deschutes County.

 

26% of Central Oregonians were served by a program or service that we funded by last year.

 

About United Way of Central Oregon

 

We’re working towards equitable access to resources for all Central Oregonians. Through grantmaking, we’re striving to reduce disparities and increase equity. Each year, we award grants to vetted local nonprofits that focus on health, education, prevention and development, financial stability, basic needs, childhood trauma, community transformation, and building resilience. We are working to ensure all community members are cared for by directing efforts and resources to where they will have the greatest impact, especially for individuals identified as being part of our community’s most vulnerable and marginalized groups.

 

DONATE TODAY!

We just announced a request for proposals (RFP) from local and regional nonprofits to apply for Community Impact Grants!

Through grants, we at your local United Way of Central Oregon (UWCO) are working to ensure all community members are cared for by directing efforts and resources to where they will have the greatest impact, especially for individuals identified as being part of our community’s most vulnerable and marginalized groups.

 

To that end, we just announced a Request for Proposals (RFP) from all organizations providing essential services regionally to individuals in Jefferson, Crook, and/or Deschutes counties and/or on the lands of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.

 

Each year, we award grants to vetted local nonprofits that focus on health, education, prevention and development, financial stability, basic needs, childhood trauma, community transformation, and building resilience.

 

This year, we’ve evolved our Community Impact funding priorities to focus on supporting community agencies as they help our community members adapt and recover from the pandemic. Funding will help these nonprofits as they stabilize the delivery of services that build resilience in individuals, families and our Central Orgon community – achieving positive outcomes in the face of adversity.

 

Last year, our grantmaking was focused exclusively on COVID-19. As a longstanding, nimble local nonprofit, we rapidly evolved our priorities to be immediately responsive to new community needs formed by the COVID-19 pandemic and created two Funds focused on Emergency Response, Recovery & Resilience that addressed the fallout of COVID-19 across Central Oregon. Through those Funds, United Way funded 44 COVID-19 Partners with $295,000 in emergency relief.

 

26% of Central Oregonians were served by one of these United Way funded programs last year.

Also last year, we created a plan for distributing $500,000 of grant funding supported by funds that came from the City of Bend’s CARES Act funding to nonprofit organizations providing essential services to vulnerable populations in the City of Bend. And, we were tasked with distributing $260,000+ in federal Emergency Food & Shelter funds in Deschutes County.

 

This year, we are accepting applications for Community Impact Grants between now and May 26th at 2pm.

 

More info can be found HERE.

 

The grant application may be found HERE.

 

Organizations with a need specific to Crook or Jefferson counties and/or on the lands of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, please email kati@unitedwaycentraloregon.org or call 541-389-6507 for additional guidance.

 

To be eligible to receive Community Impact Grants from UWCO, an organization or its fiscal sponsor must: be recognized by the IRS as a tax-exempt nonprofit under IRS code 501(c)(3); have a program with goals in the areas of education, financial stability, or health and supporting resilience building; have an annual tax return (990/990EZ); have current Profit & Loss and Balance Sheet statements; and have an active Board of Directors.

 

Nonprofit funding proposals will be assessed on a competitive basis by a Community Impact Committee (CIC), made of up volunteers representing all segments of our community. The CIC rigorously reviews applications using standardized criteria, including applicant program’s alignment with goals outlined in UWCO’s Community Impact Priorities, and decides grant funding awarded to the nonprofit applications. Following receipt of a grant, nonprofits submit reports to United Way throughout the funding cycle.

 

At United Way of Central Oregon, we fight for the health, education, financial stability, and resilience of every person in our region. We are simultaneously driving the change that is building a resilient Central Oregon and working to reduce disparities and increase equity through grantmaking and through the TRACEs movement.

 

DONATE TODAY!

We Stand In Solidarity with Asian American and Pacific Islander Communities

Today is #StopAsianHate National Day of Action and Healing. Asian American and Pacific Islander lawmakers, community leaders, and organizers have chosen today to highlight ways that community members, businesses, and communities can work to end racism and targeted violence against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs).

On March 16th, a gunman in Atlanta murdered 8 people, 6 of them women of Asian descent. We mourn the loss of Delaina Ashley Yaun, Xiaojie Tan, Daoyou Feng, Paul Andre Michels, Soon Chung Park, Hyun Jung Grant, Suncha Kim, and Yong Ae Yue. These horrific murders are heartbreaking, enraging, and devastating.

We at United Way of Central Oregon strongly condemn these acts of violence, anti-Asian racism, and we grieve these losses. Our hearts go out to the loved ones of those who were killed, and all who have been affected. And we are aware that words of sympathy are not enough. We seek to turn our words into action by standing with our Asian American and Pacific Islander community members, listening, and examining our role in dismantling systems, structures, and processes that perpetuate harm to members of our community.

Anti-Asian racism has deep roots in this country. This racist anti-Asian act of violence is not an isolated incident. People of Asian descent have been the target of bigotry and xenophobia for more than 160 years – facing racism, discrimination, and violence since before the Civil War. For instance, Chinese immigration was banned to the US by the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882; those of Asian descent faced restrictions on owning property, voting, or running for political office; and during World War II, the US government imprisoned 120,000 Japanese people in concentration camps, separated from families and deprived of rights, property, money, community, health, and their lives.

Since COVID-19, our country has seen a disturbing surge of discrimination and hate crimes directed at Asian Americans, with nearly 3,800 anti-Asian hate incidents having been self-reported across the country in the last 12 months.

Our local communities are not isolated from this. Many in our community who identify as Asian and Pacific Islander are deeply impacted not only by these recent acts of violence, but also by the history of Anti-Asian racism in this country, as well as microagressions, racism, discrimination, hate, and violence they and their loved ones may have faced right here in Central Oregon.

We at United Way are committed to building a stronger and more equitable Central Oregon. We all must speak out and act against racism towards Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and protect the basic human rights and freedoms to which we all are entitled. We urge everyone in our community to stand in support of Asian American communities.

Now is the time to educate yourself about this history of racism in Oregon and our nation, speak up, disrupt it, talk to your children, and fight anti-Asian racism and white supremacy.

 

Here are a few places to start:

To learn how you can act today to #StopAsianHate, visit this list of focused AAPI community actions.

To learn how you can help stop and report acts of hate towards the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, visit: Stop AAPI Hate.

To learn how to take action and get educated, visit:  Anti-Racism Daily.

To help individuals educate others, take action, donate, and more, visit: Anti-Asian Violence Resources.

To support Asian American advocates in Georgia, and donate to support victims and their families, visit: the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon.

 

Go deeper!

Educate yourself

Learn about the history, contributions, and past and present experiences of Asian American communities.

Watch:

Read:

Listen:

 

Speak up

Silence is consent. Now is the time for all of us, particularly those who have privilege, to speak up and challenge racism, discrimination, and white supremacy when we encounter it.

 

Report any incidence of hate or bias

If you see something, say something. Report any incidence of hate or bias locally to the Chinese Information & Service Center and nationally to Stop AAPI Hate or Asian Americans Advancing Justice.

 

Shop at businesses owned by Asian Americans

The Intentionalist has a database of businesses owned by Asian Americans.

2020 was a historic year for us! We got a new name, a new grantmaking structure, new employees, and “TRACEs 2.0!”

2020 was a historic year, as it shone a spotlight on financial and racial inequalities in our region, in Oregon, and across the nation. Nearly 40% of Central Oregonians were already living on the edge before COVID-19. The pandemic and economic fallout deepened existing disparities.

Having been a nonprofit grantmaking organization in our region for the last 69 years, we at United Way of Central Oregon revised our grantmaking structure in 2020 to be immediately responsive to new community needs caused by the pandemic, executing 6 grantmaking cycles over the year rather than our customary annual cycle.

Through our COVID-19 Emergency Response, Recovery, and Resilience efforts, we raised and granted $295,000 to 44 local and regional agencies in 6 grantmaking cycles, touching 65,000 Central Oregonians.

26% of Central Oregonians are served by at least one of these programs or services. This funding met immediate critical needs of our community’s most vulnerable and helped the agencies that serve them to adapt to new challenges in delivering services.

In 2020, United Way also distributed $260,600+ of federal and county emergency food and shelter grants to organizations that are providing meals, clothing, housing, rent, and mortgage assistance in Deschutes County, impacting over 26,000 people. And, the nonprofit was empowered last year by the City of Bend to allocate $500,000 of CARES Act funding to nonprofits providing essential services to vulnerable populations, benefiting nearly 3,500 community members.

2020 was historic for other reasons here at United Way of Central Oregon. In addition to a name change to reflect a service area that we’ve been serving for years, we also hired two new employees in service of the TRACEs movement: Kerani Mitchell and Kristen Kaul.

Joining the team in mid-August, Kerani Mitchell brings a background of nonprofit, equity consulting, and philanthropic experiences to “TRACEs 2.0.”  A graduate of Sisters High School and Seattle University, she is excited to collaborate with community members to foster a region where we all have what we need to thrive. Kerani serves as the TRACEs Movement Director.

Kristen Kaul has been part of the TRACEs initiative since 2018. With experience in statewide community wellness projects, Kristen has seen the importance of trust and relationship building with community members as we work together to tackle the root causes of trauma. She is excited to continue listening and learning with our Central Oregon communities. Kristen serves as the TRACEs Operations and Training Manager.

TRACEs (Trauma, Resilience, and Adverse Childhood Experiences) is a region-wide collective action partnership of over 150 public, private, and nonprofit sector partners in Central Oregon tackling the root causes of major social concerns such as suicide, depression, chronic diseases, incarceration, lost productivity, low performance in schools, and more. Since inception, TRACEs has touched over 8,200 lives in an effort to tackle the root cause of challenges faced by many in our community by raising awareness of the effects of trauma, reducing its incidence and impact, and building resilience in individuals, families, and our community.

With 2020 has come “TRACEs 2.0” – a reimagining of the work with a continued commitment to addressing root causes of trauma and oppression with transparency about those causes, such as white supremacy, patriarchy, and capitalism, as illustrated by last year’s events. By collaborating with communities who are currently, and have historically, been most impacted by those systems and structures, “TRACEs 2.0” aims to foster a true collective movement for, and by, the people.

As we enter 2021, we continue the valuable work we’ve always done, and we simultaneously are broadening our scope to deepen opportunities for collaboration in service of all Central Oregonians.

At United Way of Central Oregon, we fight for the health, education, financial stability, and resilience of every person in our region. We’re concurrently driving the change that is building a resilient Central Oregon and working to reduce disparities and increase equity through grantmaking and through the TRACEs movement.

GIVE today.

United Way of Central Oregon, along with other local United Ways, urges more transparency into UWW investigation and allegations

We are aware that United Way Worldwide has released a summary of the third-party inquiry carried out by a law firm investigating the allegations by multiple women describing harassment, improper conduct, sexual harassment, hostile work environment, and other serious charges at United Way Worldwide.

These allegations were deeply troubling to us at United Way of Central Oregon, and they do not reflect the ideals, policies, and practices of our local United Way. We believe all allegations of sexual harassment and any other type of harassment must be taken seriously and stand by all who bravely speak out in these situations. We do not condone any type of harassment, intimidation, or retaliation.

In the released summary, UWW indicated the investigation found no evidence of “actionable” harassment, discrimination, or retaliation, but did find areas where culture can be improved. As such, the UWW and United Way of America Boards will form a Culture Task Force to look at their own workplace environment.

While appointing a task force is a worthwhile endeavor, it alone does not allay our concerns about these allegations. Because we do not view UWW’s actions as having offered sufficient resolution, we continue to work with other local United Ways in the Pacific Northwest to pursue further answers and actions. We continue to have concerns about the scope of the investigation and its limited transparency. We are strongly urging UWW to make the full report public.

United Way of Central Oregon is a local, independent nonprofit with our own mission, vision, volunteer Board of Directors, Executive Director, and budget. At United Way of Central Oregon, we fight for the health, education, financial stability, and resilience of every person in our community.

There are 1800 independent local United Ways throughout the world, United Way Worldwide operates as a hub for the network. Local United Ways pay dues to access resources, such as training, support for multinational workplace giving campaigns, national advocacy, and use of the brand trademarks.

At United Way of Central Oregon, we are committed to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace. We do not wish these troubling allegations to impact the work we continue to do to support our local community.

United Way of Central Oregon does not condone any type of harassment, intimidation or retaliation

United Way of Central Oregon is aware of an article recently published in the Huffington Post referencing allegations of misconduct at United Way Worldwide. Our organization was not provided prior notice of these charges before they were reported publicly, nor do we possess any knowledge concerning the specific allegations.

We want to make one point perfectly clear. Sexual harassment is not acceptable in any workplace, and United Way of Central Oregon does not condone any type of harassment, intimidation or retaliation. We take all workplace issues and reports of misconduct very seriously, and any such actions are met with zero tolerance. The conduct alleged of United Way Worldwide is deeply concerning for those of us throughout the network, and we fully support the thorough, independent investigation that has been ordered by the Board of Directors of United Way Worldwide. We expect them to act upon their findings.

United Way of the Central Oregon is an independent 501(c)(3) organization, governed by a Board of Directors comprised of local community leaders. Our relationship with United Way Worldwide is transactional – we receive use of the brand in exchange for adherence to membership standards.  Our local Board oversees all legal, governance, ethical and financial management policies to ensure that United Way of Central Oregon can advance our mission.

For 67 years, the mission of United Way of Central Oregon has been working to meet the needs of vulnerable families in our region. We will continue our fight for the health, education, financial stability and resilience for all. We denounce all forms of discrimination and remain committed to building an inclusive and equitable region where everyone has the strengths, resources and support they need to thrive.

We distributed $500,000 of City of Bend CARES Act funding!

The funding is to support vulnerable populations in Bend.

 In late July, the City of Bend allocated $500,000 to us at United Way of Central Oregon to assist vulnerable populations in the Bend community. The funding came from state-directed Coronavirus Relief Funds, which were part of the federal CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act.

This week, we distributed most of those funds to nonprofits serving vulnerable populations in Bend.

“United Way of Central Oregon helped the City quickly distribute critically-needed funding to local non-profits serving some of our most vulnerable community members in Bend,” said City Manager Eric King. “This partnership is helping us take care of and support our neighbors who need it most right now.”

Funded organizations thus far include: Bethlehem Inn ($32,802), Better Together ($100,000), Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon ($12,500), Council on Aging of Central Oregon ($50,812), DAWNS House ($48,000), Every Child Central Oregon ($9,700), MountainStar Family Relief Nursery ($20,252), Open Door Café & Day Center (aka Bend Church; $5,000), REACH ($25,000), Latino Community Association ($21,892), Thrive Central Oregon ($100,000), and Volunteers In Medicine Clinic Of The Cascades ($24,222).

We used our proven volunteer-led Community Impact grantmaking process to review grant applications and allocate funds. The CARES Act funding comes with a high level of financial accountability and reporting requirements. This funding can only be used to pay for COVID-19 related expenses between March and December of 2020 that were not anticipated or budgeted and must be spent by the end of 2020. Nonprofits receiving funds must prove that they are not getting funds for the same expenses from different sources.

As the most reliable agency with capacity to reach our most marginalized community members and a community leader with a deep and longstanding familiarity of agencies serving Central Oregon’s most vulnerable, we have emerged as a clearinghouse for COVID-19 funding and donations in our region. Not only have we been entrusted with distributing this $500,000 of CARES Act funding by the City of Bend, we have also been tasked with distributing $260,600+ of federal and county emergency food and shelter grants to organizations that are providing meals, clothing, housing, rent, and mortgage assistance in Deschutes County. Some of those funds are also from the CARES Act. In addition, we raised and awarded $295,000 to 44 local and regional nonprofits as part of our own COVID-19 Emergency Response, Recovery & Resilience efforts, launched with $50,000 in seed money from a corporate partner and touching the lives of over 65,000 people.

26% of Central Oregonians are served by a program or service we fund.

We are simultaneously driving the change that is building a resilient Central Oregon and working to reduce disparities and increase equity through grantmaking and through the TRACEs movement. Since 2017, we’ve has touched the lives of nearly 8,200+ individuals as the backbone of the collective impact TRACEs movement – leading, convening, and collaborating with nearly 150 public, private, and nonprofit sector partners to build resilience in Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson Counties, as well as the lands of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.

DONATE today.

We’re kicking off our annual fundraising campaign today!

We’re raising funds to build resilience, reduce disparities, and increase equity in Central Oregon!

We’re officially kicking off our annual community fundraising campaign today (Thursday, September 24th)! And, we’re raising funds to help members of the community who are most impacted by current crises to recover and to build resilience, and to help local nonprofits to adapt.

The global pandemic, civil unrest across the nation, and wildfires in Oregon have put a spotlight on financial and racial inequalities in our region and across the country. Inequities in our systems for health, education, employment, food access, and vulnerability to natural disasters. And, inequities in financial stability and opportunity for all.

Nearly 40% of Central Oregonians were already living on the edge before COVID-19, according to our ALICE Report, a study of financial hardship, that we released in June of this year.

Then the pandemic hit, deepening existing disparities. The fallout of COVID-19 hit our most vulnerable first and hardest and will continue to do so in weeks and months and even years to come.

We were one of the first to respond – providing resources for food, financial assistance and basic needs – through our COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund. The nonprofit’s response continues – now and in the future – through our COVID-19 Recovery & Resilience Fund.

So far, we’ve awarded $295,000 to 44 local nonprofit programs so that they may successfully face new challenges of COVID-19 and can deliver essential services and meet the needs of our community’s most vulnerable.

26% of Central Oregonians are served by a United Way funded program or service.

We are simultaneously driving the change that is building a resilient Central Oregon and working to reduce disparities and increase equity through grantmaking and through the TRACEs movement.

As the backbone of the TRACEs movement, we are convening and collaborating with community partners to build resilience in our region.

We’re leading this collective impact effort involving public, private and nonprofit sectors – listening and responding to what members of our community need, convening and collaborating with community partners, mobilizing all sectors of our community to work together for everyone to live their best lives, and using resources to be a catalyst for change and to build resilience in our community.

Over 100 agencies and individuals are partnering with us on the TRACEs movement.

In this year’s community fundraising campaign, we’re raising funds to fight for the health, education, financial stability, and resilience of every person in our community. We’re focused on reducing existing disparities so that when today’s kids are tomorrow’s adults, they can thrive. Through all the uncertainties, we have been here to help locally for 68 years, and we continue  our critical work feeding people who need to be fed, keeping them in their homes, and protecting our most vulnerable.

Did you know? We recently changed our name from United Way of Deschutes County to United Way of Central Oregon. Our current focus is on our vital role of mobilizing resources and deploying them where they are needed most. Knowing that community crises often disproportionately impact Black, Indigenous, People of Color, and other marginalized groups, our funding prioritizes efforts that attend to racial and other inequities.

DONATE today and help us help our community!

We’re driving the change that’s building a resilient Central Oregon.

The global pandemic, civil unrest across the nation, and Pacific Northwest wildfires have put a spotlight on financial and racial inequalities in our region and across the country.
Inequities in our systems for health, education, employment, food access, and vulnerability to natural disasters.

And, inequities in financial stability and opportunity for all.

Nearly 40% of Central Oregonians were already living on the edge before COVID-19.
Then the pandemic hit, deepening existing disparities.

The fallout of COVID-19 hit our most vulnerable first and hardest and will continue to do so in weeks and months and even years to come.

At United Way of Central Oregon, we were one of the first to respond – providing resources for food, financial assistance and basic needs – and we continue our response – now and in the future.

We’re feeding people who need to be fed, keeping them in their homes, and protecting our most vulnerable.

With our grantmaking, we’re supporting local nonprofits to adapt. We’re also helping individuals and families in our community who are most impacted by this crisis to recover and to build resilience.

One of our most vital roles is mobilizing and deploying resources where they’re needed most.
So far, we have awarded $295,000 to 44 local nonprofit programs so that they may successfully face new challenges of COVID-19 and can deliver essential services and meet the needs of our community’s most vulnerable. These are our COVID-19 Partners.

26% of Central Oregonians are served by a program we fund.

We’re fighting for the health, education, financial stability, and resilience of every person in our Central Oregon community.

We’re driving the change that’s building a resilient Central Oregon.

We’re working to reduce disparities and increase equity through our grantmaking, as the backbone of the TRACEs movement.

Change doesn’t happen alone. Not everyone is dealt the same hand in life – from income to health to education to trauma to resilience. United, we are focused on fixing these imbalances for today’s kids so that when they are tomorrow’s adults, they can thrive.

We’re all in this together. Through all the uncertainties, we’re here to help locally.
It is this moment that defines us. Now is the time to Live United and to GIVE United.